Sunday, August 30, 2015

Fall 2015 Library Hours

The Library will begin regular semester hours on Monday, August 31, 2015. Fall hours are listed below. Any delays, closings, or changes to hours will be sent out via email to the campus community. Hours are also available online: http://libguides.frostburg.edu/libhours. If you have questions or need assistance, please contact the Library Circulation Desk at 301-687-4395.

Regular Semester Hours:

Monday - Thursday // 7:30 a.m. - 12:00 Midnight
Friday // 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Saturday // 11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Sunday // 1:00 p.m. - 12:00 Midnight

Labor Day Weekend Schedule:

Saturday, September 5 // CLOSED
Sunday, September 6 // CLOSED
Monday, September 7 – Labor Day // 1:00 p.m. – 12:00 Midnight

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

What-I’m-Reading-Wednesday: The Universal Vampire: Origins and Evolution of a Legend edited by Barbara Brodman and James E. Doan


What-I’m-Reading-Wednesday: The Universal Vampire: Origins and Evolution of a Legend edited by Barbara Brodman and James E. Doan

Vampires have been all the rage for a while now. The blockbuster Twilight series was just the latest trend in vampires in the modern consciousness. Everyone knows the story Dracula by Bram Stoker and many more know the vampires from Anne Rice. Even now there are several shows on television with vampires as the main characters, The Originals and The Vampire Diaries.

In this book, the editors take a scholarly look at the historical view of the vampire. The book contains 16 scholarly chapters on the history of vampires.  The book is divided into four parts. The first part discusses the vampires through the lens of Western European culture.  One chapter provides evidence for vampires in Norse-Icelandic Saga literature. The chapter provides the original Norse/Icelandic saga and then translates this into English for the reader. The vampire-like creature was called the Draugr.

The second part of the book looks at possible medical explanations for vampires including lack of medical understanding for some common diseases that we know existed at the time prompted people to believe in vampires. The third part of the book looks at female vampires in literature and how they have been portrayed. Finally, the last section of the book looks at how vampires have been viewed in countries outside of Europe including Mexico, Japan, and Russia.

Each chapter has a bibliography and some have information for further reading if one is interested in learning more about vampires in literature. If you want a scholarly look at the vampire myth then The Universal Vampire: Origins and Evolution of a Legend is for you.

This volume is available to request from the Ort Library catalog here: http://catalog.umd.edu/docno=004455910. Click on “Availability,” the click on the yellow “Request” button.  Log in using your first name and 14 digit library barcode from your ID.  If you need assistance, please contact the Circulation Desk at 301 687-4395.

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

What-I'm-Reading-Wednesday: Kill Chain: The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins by Andrew Cockburn

Author Andrew Cockburn, the Washington editor of Harper’s magazine, built his reputation as an expert on governmental and military affairs covering the U.S. and Soviet arms race and occasional clashes of the Cold War.  Although his latest book, Kill Chain: The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins, focuses on the current “drone war” in the Middle East and Africa, Cockburn shows how the current state of affairs in the U.S. military has its roots in both the decades-long conflict with the U.S.S.R. and in some cases, lessons learned (or not learned) during WWII.

Kill Chain opens in 2010 with a case of mistaken identity during a U.S. drone strike that resulted in numerous civilian deaths.   From this tragic but compelling episode, Cockburn takes the reader back to the 1940’s when U.S. bombers were striking daily against Nazi Germany in an effort to “bring the Reich to its knees.”  He shows how much of the conventional wisdom about air power at the time was gradually disproven, and then summarily ignored as the United States government became entangled by the “Military-Industrial Complex” that President Dwight Eisenhower so famously warned of in his farewell address.   (Fun fact I learned while reading this book:  In the original draft of his speech, Eisenhower had labeled the thing to be feared as the “Military-Industrial-Congressional Complex” but decided to remove the word “Congressional”, stating later that he was already “…taking on the military and private industry.  I couldn’t take on Congress as well.”)

As the Cold War escalated, ended, and then was replaced, (first by the War on Drugs, and then later the War on Terror) Cockburn demonstrates how the U.S. government has continuously invested more and more money on high-tech weapons (such as drones) that are often not only unwanted, but in some cases dangerously flawed.

Kill Chain is available on the New Arrivals shelf in the Library’s main lobby, or by requesting it through the Library catalog hereClick on the "Availability" link on the catalog record, then click on the yellow "Request" button. Log in using your 14-digit Library barcode number (located on your University ID), and your last name. You will then be able to select your pick-up location. The Library will notify you via email when your book has arrived for pick-up. If you need assistance with this process, please contact the Circulation Desk at 301-687-4395.

**Post written by Charles Courtney

Friday, August 14, 2015

Featured Online Resource: National Immunization Awareness Month Resources

Since August is National Immunization Awareness Month, the following resources are available to help you become informed about immunizations.

from her doctorCreative Commons Universal (CCO 1.0).


This is only a small list of the information that is available on this topic.  Please use and share the information above, but also feel free to continue your research with library resources as well as online information from other reliable organizations and government agencies.



Wednesday, August 12, 2015

What-I'm-Reading-Wednesday: When Paris Went Dark by Ronald C. Rosbottom

When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940-1944 by Ronald C. Rosbottom is a compelling narrative of the lives of Parisians during "les années noires". Inspired by his time in the city during his undergraduate years, Rosbottom meticulously researched this dark time in order to provide what he calls a "tactile" history of the period, or a portrait of how everyday Parisians lived, worked, loved, and raised families in a city no longer their own. Much has been written about the occupation of Paris across the decades, and many aspects of life during this time have been shrouded in silence and mystery due to the controversial nature of the occupation. Rosbottom's research included interviews with those still living who were in Paris during this time period, and he astutely mined their stories for details not often shared in other similar histories.

Rosbottom lays out the chronology of the invasion and occupation from the beginning, including brief explanations of the events leading up to the occupation. The painstakingly detailed preparations of the Germans, their deep knowledge of the architectural, structural, and social layout of the city, and the experiences of previous failed attempts to take the city in earlier times all factored into the creation of an almost seamless takeover. Many fled the city prior to the occupation, but those who stayed, whether due to lack of resources needed to leave, or because they felt a devotion to the city and their French heritage, were presented daily with great ethical questions related to their interactions with the occupiers. Rosbottom separates those who "collaborated" from those who merely lived in a state of "accommodation" in order to survive. This distinction is essential in understanding how the Parisians viewed their own existence during this time, and to some extent in how the history of this era has long affected interpretations of France's role in the war.

When Paris Went Dark is available on the Library’s “New Arrival Shelf” in the main lobby, or you can place a request for this title directly from the Library's catalog hereClick on the "Availability" link on the catalog record, then click on the yellow "Request" button. Log in using your 14-digit Library barcode number (located on your University ID), and your last name. You will then be able to select your pick-up location. The Library will notify you via email when your book has arrived for pick-up. If you need assistance with this process, please contact the Circulation Desk at 301-687-4395.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

What-I'm-Reading-Wednesday: The Battle of Midway by Craig L. Symonds

The Battle of Midway is part of an ongoing series from Oxford University Press entitled “Pivotal Moments in American History.”   Author Craig Symonds states in his introduction, “there are few moments in American history in which the course of events tipped so suddenly and dramatically as it did on June 4, 1942.  At ten o’clock that morning, the Axis powers were winning World War II…An hour later, the balance had shifted the other way.”  

Symonds begins the story of that shift on Christmas Day in 1941 with Admiral Chester Nimitz arriving at Pearl Harbor to take command of the U.S. Pacific Fleet – a fleet that was still reeling (and in some cases, still burning) from the Japanese surprise attack just a few weeks before. 

Roughly the first half of the book covers the people, background, and events that led both the American and Japanese fleets from Pearl Harbor to their fateful rendezvous north of Midway Island six months later.   Symonds focuses not only on the opposing commanders, but also the many behind-the-scenes players who ultimately contributed to the battle’s outcome.  The second half of the book narrates in detail the battle itself, including addressing several “controversies and legends” that have arisen and in some cases persisted in previous historical accounts.  

The Battle of Midway is available on the Library’s “New Arrival Shelf” in the main lobby, or you can place a request for this title directly from the Library's catalog hereClick on the "Availability" link on the catalog record, then click on the yellow "Request" button. Log in using your 14-digit Library barcode number (located on your University ID), and your last name. You will then be able to select your pick-up location. The Library will notify you via email when your book has arrived for pick-up. If you need assistance with this process, please contact the Circulation Desk at 301-687-4395.

**Post written by Charles Courtney

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

What-I'm-Reading-Wednesday: Hospital Sketches by Louisa May Alcott

Originally printed in 1863 Hospital Sketches by Louisa May Alcott recounts Alcott's service as a Union nurse in Georgetown in 1862. Published in installments for The Commonwealth newspaper, the author explains her decision to volunteer and details the hazards encountered during her journey from Concord, Massachusetts to the Union Hospital in Washington, D.C. Her portraits of fellow travelers demonstrate her keen skill observing and describing the social culture of her day.

After arriving at her duty station dubbed "Hurly-burly House" Alcott encounters the wounded from the Battle of Fredericksburg. She washes, dresses, feeds and pays vigil to a succession of soldiers during the next two months that include patients from both armies. Wards of 40 beds include both wounded and diseased. Alcott describes hospital staff, the crude medical instruments and the prevailing medicines.

She recounts her impressions of individual patients and their stories of gallant heroism and devotion to duty. She remarks about the camaraderie of men on the ward and their courtesy toward her. Before the end of her three month tour, Alcott contracts typhoid but stubbornly refuses to leave until her father arrives to escort her home.

The library's copy is available on Floor 4 in E621.A34. This edition, published by the University of California, Irvine in 2004 includes an extensive introduction by Alice Fahs, draws on documented primary sources to introduce the Alcott family, describes the historical period and elaborates on the roles adopted by women during the Civil War.

If you are inspired to learn more after reading the sketch, plan to visit the National Museum of Civil Medicine in Frederick on your next day trip.